Country Ham, Cushaws, and Stack Cakes: A Celebration of the Appalachian Table

Saturday, Apr 22, 12:30pm to 1:30pm

Blowing Rock Art & History Museum

159 Chestnut St.
map

Free with museum admission

Jonathan
8282959099
info@blowingrockmuseum.org

Roving journalist, author, and filmmaker Fred Sauceman will explore some of the iconic products and dishes of the region as he tells the stories of the people behind the food.  He’ll talk of pepperoni rolls from West Virginia, sorghum syrup made on the Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee, the Dip Dogs of Virginia, the glories of Beans All the Way, and the profound simplicity of redeye gravy. He’ll herald cooks, farmers, and restaurant owners who dedicate their lives to feeding their neighbors and to building community in Appalachia.

Admission

Free with Museum admission (reduced for Savor Blowing Rock), $4 seniors, students, active military, EBT cardholders, $5 general admission)

About the Speaker

Fred Sauceman is a prolific chronicler of the foodways of Appalachia. According to Garden&Gun magazine, “His books are the definitive guides to eating and drinking in the rocky cradle of country ham and skillet cornbread.” Sauceman has written and edited seven food-related books, including the three-volume series The Place Setting: Timeless Tastes of the Mountain South, from Bright Hope to Frog Level and his latest book, Buttermilk & Bible Burgers:  More Stories from the Kitchens of Appalachia. Sauceman and his wife, Jill, are regular contributors to Blue Ridge Country magazine, and Sauceman writes a column for Smoky Mountain Living magazine. His column “Potluck” appears monthly in the Johnson City Press, and he appears monthly in the “Food with Fred” segment on WJHL-TV in Johnson City. Sauceman has produced seven documentary films on various aspects of Appalachian foodways. His next book, The Proffitts of Ridgewood:  An Appalachian Family’s Life in Barbecue, will be published this fall by Mercer University Press. Mercer has also recently named him editor of a new series of books on Southern food.  Sauceman headed up the University Relations Office at East Tennessee State University for nearly 25 years.  He continues to work at ETSU, delivering the news every day on public radio station WETS-FM and teaching a course entitled The Foodways of Appalachia.  He is a native of Greeneville, Tennessee.   

Sauceman will have copies of his books for sale and signing.

Locally-farmed refreshments will be provided by the generosity of Blue Ridge Women in Agriculture.

Photo credits: Photo of Fred Sauceman, courtesy Fred Sauceman